JET Program Alumni Association of the Southeast

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Daily Yomiuri: Japanese government announces increase for JET Programme

Added on by JETAA Southeast.



According to a Daily Yomiuri article, the Japanese government plans to increase JET Programme participants by 2,300 between 2015 and 2019 with an eye towards eventually increasing the program to 20,000. This seems to be in line with LDP policies announced back in April.

Read an English version of the article over at Jetwit.com!

Announcement about IUC The Nippon Foundation Fellowship

Added on by JETAA Southeast.



Friendly Forward: Mr. Tatsuaki Kobayashi from The Nippon Foundation:

"[T]he IUC (Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies) is one of the leading Japanese language institute for highest level of Japanese. Since 2013, the Nippon Foundation has offered fellowships to 10 promising graduate students of Japan Studies doctorate courses in the US, who participated 10 months Japanese language training course in Yokohama.

The Nippon Foundation has decided to expand the number of grantees from 10 to 20, and also to extend the scope of the program from Japanese Studies to Professional Schools such as law, MBA, governmental officials, journalists and so on. This is a new initiative that will start from 2016, and IUC has recently made announcement for the application from potential candidates. I suppose that this program will be appealing to some of JETAA members who want to seek for their professional career paths that are related to Japan...

You may find more details about the program in the following website:

http://web.stanford.edu/dept/IUC/cgi-bin/programs/nippon-foundation.php

If you have any questions, please contact IUC secretariat: iucjapan@stanford.edu."

Plans announced to place ALT's in all primary schools in Japan!

Added on by JETAA Southeast.
The JET Program is expanding!
ALTs To Be Placed in All Primary Schools
(Via The Yomiuri Shimbun, JETWit.com)
The government has decided to increase the number of Assistant Language Teachers considerably over a five-year period, starting from the next school year, to strengthen English education at primary schools.

Aiming to create a system in which ALTs will be assigned to all public primary schools by the 2019 school year, the Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Ministry, the Internal Affairs and Communications Ministry and the Foreign Ministry plan to increase the number of ALTs by about 2,300 over five years as a national project. Combined with ALTs who are hired independently by municipalities, the ministries intend to expand the total number of ALTs to 20,000, or 1.5 times the current level, by the 2019 school year.

The education ministry has decided to lower the starting age for English education from the current fifth year of primary school to the third year by the 2020 school year, and make it an official subject from the fifth year.

Experts have said it is important to secure a sufficient number of native English speakers, and utilize them to enhance the learning environments for students.

About 800 ALTs first came to Japan in 1987 when the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program was launched as a state international exchange project. As of 2002, the number of ALTs had increased to about 5,600, but it began to decrease after that due to financial problems. The current number is about 4,100.

Besides ALTs on the JET Program, about 8,000 ALTs hired independently by municipalities and other organizations have been dispatched to local primary and middle schools across the nation. In some cases, an ALT teaches at several schools.

According to experts, considerable disparity exists among the nation’s 21,000 public primary schools. While some schools have resident ALTs, some schools are visited by an ALT once about every six months.

The government therefore plans to increase the number of ALTs in the JET Program in stages. From the 2020 school year onward, English lessons will increase from the current once a week to three times a week for fifth-grade and sixth-grade students. Third-grade and fourth-grade students will have English lessons once or twice a week, and the education ministry plans to have ALTs frequently instruct students in English classes.

The budget for English education utilizing ALTs is expected to increase from about ¥30 billion this school year to about ¥50 billion a year eventually. The government also plans to launch a subsidy system for supporting municipalities that independently hire ALTs.

ALT

An ALT assists Japanese teachers in teaching foreign languages such as English at primary, middle and high schools. In addition to ALTs who come to Japan on the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program, a state international exchange project, others are directly hired by municipalities or private organizations contracted to dispatch ALTs.

From the 2011 school year, foreign language studies became compulsory for fifth-grade and sixth-grade primary school students. The role of ALTs has expanded to include assisting with pronunciation and listening comprehension.